No somos cazafantasmas

No somos cazafantasmas

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We Are Not Ghostbusters

SPINE-TINGLING STORIES ON THE DARK SIDES OF TECHNOLOGY | 2018 | 256 pp

What would the world look like if you had to pay tech companies to have access to your own memories?

Set in a not-so-distant technological dystopia, each one of these gripping shatters any semblance of certainty surrounding who we are and who we thought we were, artfully scrutinize the underlying anxieties of contemporary cyber-threats.

Robles shrewdly portrays the inner workings of the multiple interests behind a new world order that monetizes and deals in the personal and collective memory: oppressive governments artificially manipulating the national history, tech companies charging users to access to their own memories...

These unsettling yet plausible stories are a clear and captivating meditation on the role of reminiscing in the construction of collective and personal identity, and a warn of a disturbing future which is somehow already upon us.

Spanish language original · English sample available

Rights:

World Spanish: Seix Barral, 2018

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“An unsettling universe portraying the ways in which technology may manipulate our memories”

—Edmundo Paz Soldán

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“His stories could easily fill an entire season of ‘Black Mirror’ and could spark a certain paranoia required for us to start questioning the present world”

La República (Perú)

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“Short stories written with a novelistic flair, depicting the economic interests behind memory and privacy”

—Dante Trujillo

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“Juan Manuel Robles’ collection of stories bursts our narcissistic, digital bubble”

—Renzo Gómez

 

Juan Manuel Robles

LIMA, 1978

Juan Manuel Robles is a writer, journalist and teacher. After spending his formative years in Perú, he moved to New York City where he was a recipient of a MFA Creative Writing Fellowship at the NYU. 

He is the author of Nuevos juguetes de la guerra fría (Seix Barral, 2015), one of the most celebrated novels in the last years in Perú, was a New York Times Notable Book of 2016 (Spanish Edition), and a Best Book of the Year to Understand Latin America at El País. 

In 2007 he was named by the Hay Festival in Bogotá as one of the 39 best Latin American authors under the age of 40.

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